Malmö - Turning torso

Day 5: Malmö, More Like Malnö!

Introduction

It is Thursday, and there are only two full days left in Copenhagen; before my Sunday return home, I figure it is time to get one of the things I wanted to do off my list: go to Malmö, Sweden, check it out, and check out the Turning Torso building. 

Against the advice of locals, I proceeded with my plans to go to Malmö. Went to the Train station, and the machine kept trying to sell me a ticket to Helsingborg, Sweden, I probably should have done that. I then ignored cosmic forces with the first three trains I was supposed to catch to Malmö were canceled, you would think I would just get a refund for my tickets, but no, not me. I have to learn to believe the locals. My 20-minute train trip ended up being 120 minutes with all the waiting and avoiding all the Rockstar Energy drink people all over the station, almost forcing it on you. 

They do make taking the train here difficult, if you ask someone with the railroad they will tell you train 27 at 10:22, but on the electronic boards, it is Train 1083 to Växjö. The only real thing to go by is it is at 10:22. When the track is announced, all the intermediate stops like Malmö are shown on the electronic board. The train itself was comfortable and fairly crowded, which emptied and refilled at the airport, great idea putting a train station right in the airport. 

Pictures

Sorry, these pictures look a bit washed out, but I have something wrong with a setting somewhere, and I can’t figure it out. I think it might be because these were shot in RAW on my iPhone, who knows? I shot 120 pictures that day and found 24 I liked enough to write about, that has to tell you how crappy I did on day 3.

Crossing the Øresund

I cannot find a definitive distance of the crossing of the Øresund, I would say it is around 10 miles if you count the tunnel, causeway bridge, and approaches. The weather was just gray crap, just low gray clouds, and the temperature was right around 30°, and the water looked a lot colder.

Arriving in Malmö

The train emptied once we got to Malmö, the platform was packed, and the stairs were packed, but once I got to the street it was like everyone just disappeared. There were 100-plus people, and in a moment it was maybe 10 people. In the immediate area, with no trace of where they went.

Malmö Ghost Town.

I walked just over a mile to Wayne’s coffee shop where I had lunch, and I saw 2 people on the street, it was midday on a weekday, and you would think people would be going to lunch and such. Malmö is the third-largest city in Sweden, you would think that there would be more people walking around, just weird.

You can still see remnants of Malmö’s industrial past, but not for long, the last of the factories in central Malmö are being dismantled, and the shipyards are all gone.  The city is redeveloping some of the industrial areas into housing. Kockums Shipbuilding, at one time one of the largest shipbuilders in the world, was founded and headquartered in Malmö and had the largest crane in the world in the 70s. 

Turning Torso

Malmö, Sweden boasts the iconic “Turning Torso” building, a remarkable architectural masterpiece that once held the title of the tallest building in Scandinavia, soaring to a towering height of 627 feet. The Turning Torso is an emblematic symbol of modernity and innovation in Malmö, drawing visitors from near and far. Its distinctive design, characterized by a unique twisting structure, stands as a testament to the city’s commitment to pushing the boundaries of architectural creativity.

While the Turning Torso is undeniably a cool and captivating building, its worthiness as a side trip destination can be influenced by the season of your visit. In the winter months, when Malmö experiences colder temperatures and shorter daylight hours, some travelers may find that the overall experience is diminished compared to a visit during the warmer seasons. However, for architecture enthusiasts, the Turning Torso remains an intriguing landmark, offering a glimpse into the bold and imaginative world of contemporary architecture.

Exploring its design, enjoying the panoramic views from its heights, and appreciating the cityscape that surrounds it can still make for a memorable and unique experience, regardless of the time of year. So, while winter may present some challenges, the Turning Torso remains an iconic attraction that showcases the city’s commitment to pushing the boundaries of architectural creativity.

Waterfront

I spent a while walking along the waterfront, before making the trip back to the train station. I think the thing that ruined the trip for me was that the city was dead, and they were not at the bad part of winter yet. Not only that, but I just about lost interest., and wanted to get back to Copenhagen.

Conclusion

Will I ever return to Malmö, probably not, I think like Warsaw, Poland, they have abandoned their historic roots and lost their charm? 

No Balloons, really?


Comments

One response to “Day 5: Malmö, More Like Malnö!”

  1. […] The last full day of my trip to Copenhagen; this is a beautiful city that I hope to return to in the next couple of years or sooner (wink wink).  This was the furthest North I have ever been on the ground; polar flights don’t count, and the first trip to a large European city where I didn’t do much research. I want to visit more churches here on future trips, and the museums look interesting.  I would also like to venture into more of the countryside outside of Copenhagen; I could even be talked into a return trip to Malmö. […]

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